No bulldozers! Plans for reforesting

guardians of the forestRecently, Ruwi (Ambrosius Ruwindrijarto) visited Muara Tae to meet with the Dayak Benuaq tribe and learn what is needed for them to begin restoring the areas of their forest that have been illegally destroyed by palm oil companies. He sent this update for friends who supported the ceremony they completed in September 2014 to protect their ancestral forest in Borneo:
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Three spiritual lessons from the Dayak-Benuaq tribe on how to live in the heart of destruction

dance before buffaloMY JOURNEY to Borneo was a pilgrimage into the heart of destruction. It was the darkest place I could imagine, because the Dayak people of Muara Tae were watching their ancestral forest disappear to illegal bulldozing and had been unable to stop it. While I was there, I agreed to help them crowd-fund an ancient vow ceremony on behalf of the forest, which the elders said was their last real hope. Now, with the help of collaborators around the globe, their ceremony has been carried out. In the weeks that have passed since its conclusion, I’ve been reflecting on that process, and here I share three spiritual lessons that I learned from the Dayak, which I hope will be as useful to you as they are to me.
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The 64-day Borneo ceremony draws to a close: A report from the village

at the ceremonyThe Dayak Benuaq hosts of the Borneo ceremony have spent the past month in a camp they set up at the site of the climactic vow and buffalo rituals. During this time, they made extensive material and spiritual preparations for this event, where they hosted somewhere between 700 and 1000 people from their own and neighboring villages to restore balance and unity in their care for the forest. Ruwi (Ambrosius Ruwindrijarto) has acted as a bridge to the people of Muara Tae as we made the effort to fund the ceremony and share the story of these guardians of the rainforest. On behalf of all supporters, Ruwi attended the last days of the ceremony and sent this report from the village:
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The pig festival: All-night ritual and feast ends the first phase of the ceremony in Muara Tae

foto-4The first phase of the ceremony drew to a close with the pig festival, which required extensive preparations, both spiritually and practically, as hundreds of people from neighboring villages were invited. The preparation phase was called Lamaak Lehoai, during which the shaman chanted mantras for each phase of preparation. Different destinations have different music: there is a specific song and music for going to the forest for wood, another for going to the village, another for the river and so forth. When this ritual was finished, they held the public event, which marked the end of the first phase of the ceremony. Here is Masrani’s report from the village:
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Suggested inquiry practice to parallel the Borneo ceremony

women make preparationINTERESTED IN CREATING an ongoing group, event or individual practice that roughly parallels the ceremony? Here is a simple structure for you to draw from that can last an afternoon, a day or a number of weeks:

1- Begin with a process that reminds you of the interconnectedness of life: the long view that includes the time before humans, as well as our ancestors and descendants, and what our role on the earth really is. The Dayak say humans were put here with the role of keeping the earth in balance. Their tribe was assigned to their particular rainforest. So what is our role in keeping the earth in balance, as members of the industrial culture? That is the inquiry we are doing together — to come to a shared sense of purpose. In the campaign, we have been using “What would love do?” as the organizing question for our inquiries and actions.
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The first phase of the Dayak Benuaq’s ceremony: A report from the village

offerings to ancestorsRUWI AND I JUST RETURNED LAST WEEK FROM BORNEO, where we participated in a number of the rituals leading up to the large and festive pig feast, which was just held a few days ago and included hundreds of people from neighboring villages. At the phase of the ceremony which we attended, the rituals involved only the core group of host families as they prepared the spiritual ground and attended to the extensive physical preparations needed for the larger gathering to come.
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